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  Australian Law Journal   (Australia)
  Volume 83, Number 10, October 2009
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  • CURRENT ISSUES — Editor: Mr Justice P W Young AO
  • London Conference: The end of the judicial role of the House of Lords
        p.647                                                                                      +cite    
  • Adieu to the Law Lords
        p.647                                                                                      +cite    
  • Right of prisoner to require sentence be carried out
        p.649                                                                                      +cite    
  • Anti-terrorist laws and balance
        p.651                                                                                      +cite    
  • Freedom of association vs anti-discrimination
        p.652                                                                                      +cite    
  • Appeal courts as undesirables
        p.652                                                                                      +cite    
  • State parliaments and the universe
        p.653                                                                                      +cite    
  • Azaleas, Croydon and the law
        p.653                                                                                      +cite    

  • CONVEYANCING AND PROPERTY — Editor: Peter Butt
  • Indefeasibility and overriding statutes: An attempted solution
        p.655                                                                                      +cite    
  • Less power to them: A note on the mortgagee's diminishing expectations of indefeasibility
        p.658                                                                                      +cite    

  • OVERSEAS LAW — Editor: Ross Buckley
  • Is a statutory licence property?
        p.660                                                                                      +cite    

  • RECENT CASES — Editor: Mr Justice P W Young AO
  • Vendor and purchaser: Notice to complete—forfeiture of deposit
        p.664                                                                                      +cite    
  • Convening and cancelling corporate meetings
        p.664                                                                                      +cite    
  • "Good faith" and trade marks
        p.665                                                                                      +cite    
  • "Rough and ready" is sometimes not good enough
        p.665                                                                                      +cite    
  • Incrimination by own computer
        p.666                                                                                      +cite    
  • Quasi specific performance
        p.666                                                                                      +cite    
  • Administrative law: Delegation of authority
        p.667                                                                                      +cite    
  • What is an aircraft?
        p.667                                                                                      +cite    
  • Easements by possession: Public habitually walking through golf course
        p.668                                                                                      +cite    

  • ARTICLES
  • THE QUEEN'S CASE
        Dermot Ryan
        p.669                                                                                      +cite        
        This article explores The Queen's Case (1820) 2 Brod & B 284; 129 ER 976. As well as being a sensational episode in English history, The Queen's Case is authority for the basic rule of the common law that a witness cannot be asked any question about the contents of a document, unless the document is first shown to the witness and put in evidence as part of the case of the party represented by the cross-examiner. An undesirable consequence of this rule was that the party represented by the cross-examiner was forced into evidence, with consequential effects on the order of final address. This article provides some highlights of Queen Caroline's trial for adultery, in particular the sometimes questionable conduct and tactics of her legal team, before turning to the significant implications of the rule and its descendants for the conduct of modern litigation.
  • TRADE PRACTICES ACT, s 53(E): WHEN WILL THEY EVER LEARN?
        R J Desiatnik
        p.689                                                                                      +cite        
        Section 53(e) of the Trade Practices Act 1974 (Cth), and its State and Territory analogues, provide, one might confidently believe, ample protection against false or misleading advertising over the price at which goods are supplied. However recent actions by suppliers, and court outcomes following those actions, do not appear to lend much credence to such a belief. This article records and examines such events, and suggests several methods, some radical, by which much more could be done to achieve better compliance with those provisions. Given how easy it is to mislead over price, such an aim is clearly warranted.
  • DISCRETION, POWER AND THE "ACCRUED" JURISDICTION OF THE FAMILY COURT
        Lee Aitken
        p.694                                                                                      +cite        
        Although it is clear that the Family Court enjoys an accrued jurisdiction, a number of doubts remain about its operation. In particular, it has been suggested that it is "discretionary". If so, this would cut across accepted principles with respect to the exercise of the jurisdiction generally. Furthermore, the issue is of vital importance in a family law context where the myriad factual matters and parties involved in a matrimonial dispute bring the issue of accrued relief into sharp focus. Paradoxically, the question of accrued jurisdiction in the Federal Court usually involves some arid jurisdictional question, raised by a party seeking a mere tactical advantage. In the Family Court, accrued jurisdiction may frequently be a central issue as the recent cases discussed in this article indicate. The article examines the peculiar features of accrued jurisdiction in the Family Court where a number of difficult questions remain to be resolved.
  • SPEECH TO THE AUSTRALIAN LAWYERS PHIL-HELLENIC ASSOCIATION
        Hon Justice P W Young AO
        p.704                                                                                      +cite        
        In examining the quotation by the Greek philosopher Pythagoras, "Do not say a little in many words, but a great deal in few", the author first provides a brief account of the Pythagoras Theorem and then of Pythagoras the philosopher before focusing on what he could have possibly meant by the quote. After a discussion of its possible interpretations, whether it advocates brevity and clarity, it being better to know nothing about a subject than just a little, or of it being better to know a lot about one thing than a little about many things, the author looks at the relevance of Pythagoras' words to the modern lawyer.