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  Australian Law Journal   (Australia)
  Volume 80, Number 10, October 2006
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  • CURRENT ISSUES -- Editor: Mr Justice PW Young AO
  • The best way of appointing silk
        p.635                                                                                      +cite    
  • Territorial ambit of decrees in equity
        p.636                                                                                      +cite    
  • Control orders
        p.636                                                                                      +cite    
  • House v The King
        p.636                                                                                      +cite    
  • Family provision legislation
        p.637                                                                                      +cite    
  • Meaningless statistics
        p.638                                                                                      +cite    

  • CONVEYANCING AND PROPERTY -- Editor: Peter Butt
  • Deeds poll and covenants enforceable at the suit of a non-party
        p.639                                                                                      +cite    
  • Writs of execution
        p.640                                                                                      +cite    
  • No set-off against purchaser of reversion
        p.642                                                                                      +cite    

  • FAMILY LAW
  • Position under s 79 of property held by discretionary trusts
        p.643                                                                                      +cite    
  • Which costs rules apply for family law services prior to proceedings?
        p.644                                                                                      +cite    

  • OVERSEAS LAW
  • The not-so-uniform Commercial Code
        p.646                                                                                      +cite    

  • RECENT CASES -- Editor: Mr Justice PW Young AO
  • Cross border insolvency
        p.650                                                                                      +cite    
  • What is an insecticide?
        p.650                                                                                      +cite    
  • Limitation of actions: Acknowledgment
        p.651                                                                                      +cite    
  • Partnership: Dissolution - trading with assets thereafter
        p.651                                                                                      +cite    
  • Compensation for grant of easement
        p.652                                                                                      +cite    
  • Is the right to a cherished car licence plate a chose in action?
        p.652                                                                                      +cite    
  • Stamp duty avoidance
        p.653                                                                                      +cite    

  • ARTICLES
  • WHO IS TELLING THE TRUTH? PSYCHOLOGY, COMMON SENSE AND THE LAW
        Hon Justice Peter McClellan
        p.655                                                                                      +cite        
        There are two levels of truth. Real truth and perceived truth. Although real truth is what actually happened perceived truth informs most of our understanding of the world. The law has traditionally devised its own rules of human behaviour and created its own norms for interpreting that behaviour. The jury system is both a symbolic and practical manifestation of the faith the community places in a process in which lay people are required to decide who is telling the truth. Juries are directed to employ their "common sense" and experience of the world in coming to their decision. Although "common sense" is a helpful guide, commonly held perceptions may not always accord with the scientific record. There is a need for a constant dialogue between the lawyer and the psychologist in the search for truth.
  • PROBLEMS WITH FACT-FINDING
        Justice David Ipp
        p.667                                                                                      +cite        
        There are many pitfalls in determining whether a person is telling the truth and whether a truthful witness is giving accurate evidence. Psychological research shows that cognitive and other illusions apply to most humans, including judges. These affect the reliability of demeanour findings. There is a need for self-understanding and self-knowledge on the part of judges. Judges should focus on probabilities and inconsistencies rather than demeanour. Appellate courts should regard demeanour-based findings of fact, contrary to the probabilities, as appealable error if adequate reasons are not given for them.
  • UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES: INTERNATIONAL ACCOUNTING STANDARDS, PUBLIC UNIT TRUSTS AND THE RULE AGAINST PERPETUITIES
        Associate Professor John Glover and Professor Paul von Nessen
        p.675                                                                                      +cite        
        Australian adoption of international accounting standards from 1 July 2005 has had a number of unintended consequences. When unit trust deeds have "buy-back" provisions, operative on pre-determined vesting days, international accounting standards re-classify units in those trusts as "debt" rather than "equity" interests. Responsible entities of managed investment schemes structured as unit trusts are among those affected. Unit buy-back provisions operative on vesting day are a common feature of scheme constitutions because of the widely-held belief that unit trusts are void unless they vest within a period defined by the rule against perpetuities. This article examines that belief and concludes that the rule against perpetuities does not generally affect Australian unit trusts. Attempts to elude the perpetuities rule are then reviewed. An apparently insuperable problem involving unit trusts and perpetuities in the conflict of laws is identified. Mutually inconsistent perpetuity periods may apply to unit trusts which hold real property in several jurisdictions.
  • CYBERCRIME IN THE PRIVATE SECTOR: PARTNERSHIPS BETWEEN THE PRIVATE SECTOR AND LAW ENFORCEMENT
        Janine Wilson
        p.694                                                                                      +cite        
        The large scale of cybercrime in the financial services industry, and the private sector in general, creates many challenges for both the private sector and law enforcement. This article considers the nature and scale of cybercrime in the private sector and in particular, the financial services industry, and the need for effective public and private partnerships to stem the tide of rising incidences of cybercrime, obtain recovery of lost funds and pursue the perpetrators of cybercrime.