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  Australian Law Journal   (Australia)
  Volume 81, Number 2, February 2007
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  • CURRENT ISSUES -- Editor: Mr Justice PW Young AO
  • Juries
        p.55                                                                                        +cite    
  • Employers can't win
        p.55                                                                                        +cite    
  • The McDermott case
        p.55                                                                                        +cite    
  • New South Wales Judicial Commission Annual Report
        p.56                                                                                        +cite    
  • Assessment of evidence
        p.57                                                                                        +cite    
  • Jury reform
        p.57                                                                                        +cite    
  • Our multicultural profession
        p.57                                                                                        +cite    
  • Don't try these defences
        p.58                                                                                        +cite    

  • CONVEYANCING AND PROPERTY -- Editor: Peter Butt
  • Landlord's withholding consent to improvements
        p.59                                                                                        +cite    
  • Metaphysics of severance
        p.59                                                                                        +cite    
  • When are co-purchasers in breach?
        p.60                                                                                        +cite    

  • PRACTICAL ADVOCACY -- Editor: Professor John Harber Phillips AC QC
  • "Me! Mate": Splitting the case
        p.62                                                                                        +cite    

  • FAMILY LAW -- Editor: Anthony Dickey QC
  • Declaring the name of a child on adoption
        p.65                                                                                        +cite    
  • Part VIIIAA and property held by trusts
        p.66                                                                                        +cite    

  • RECENT CASES - Editor: Mr Justice PW Young AO
  • When is a solicitor not a solicitor?
        p.68                                                                                        +cite    
  • Interlocutory injunction: Whether damages adequate remedy
        p.68                                                                                        +cite    
  • Equitable estoppel
        p.68                                                                                        +cite    
  • Trustees: Judicial advice -- When given
        p.69                                                                                        +cite    
  • What is rail use?
        p.69                                                                                        +cite    
  • Contracts: Rescission -- Restitution
        p.70                                                                                        +cite    
  • Equity: Defence of laches
        p.70                                                                                        +cite    
  • Restrictive covenants
        p.71                                                                                        +cite    
  • Injunctions against all the world
        p.71                                                                                        +cite    
  • Freezing injunctions: Liability of bank for damages
        p.72                                                                                        +cite    
  • Prisoner in all but name
        p.72                                                                                        +cite    

  • ARTICLES
  • PROPERTY BY ANY OTHER NAME: THE TROUBLE WITH SHAREHOLDER CLAIMS IN AUSTRALIA
        Scott Wotherspoon
        p.75                                                                                        +cite        
        Section 1070A of the Corporations Act 2001 (Cth) provides that a share is an item of personal property. When a contract to subscribe for shares is induced by the company's misrepresentation, the shareholder enjoys a right to rescind that subscription contract. The right is unequivocally proprietary. A consequence of rescission is to re-vest title in the personal property transferred. Being proprietary in nature, the right can persist even when the company is wound up. This seemingly orthodox position is not reflected in the authorities, which are dominated by three 19th century British cases: Oakes v Turquand (1867) LR 2 HL 325; Tennent v City of Glasgow Bank (1879) LR 4 App Cas 615 and Houldsworth v City of Glasgow Bank (1880) LR 5 App Cas 317. This article attacks the basal legitimacy of those cases and describes the consequences that their overruling will have on Australian company law.
  • ABOLISHING THE CRIME OF TREASON
        Graham S. McBain
        p.94                                                                                        +cite        
        The Treason Act 1351 is the oldest criminal legislation on the English statute book. From it, the United States and Commonwealth countries have derived their concept of treason. However, many of the texts on treason are very old and difficult to obtain. Also, there has been no modern summary of the law of treason under English law. The last was that of Stephen, more than 100 years ago. This article therefore considers all the principal texts and articles on treason as well the historical background to the two principal offences which remain: levying war and adhering to the enemy. The purpose is to assert that the crime of treason is no longer required and that the offence of adhering to the enemy should be an offence of treachery, enacted during wartime only.