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  Australian Law Journal   (Australia)
  Volume 80, Number 2, February 2006
  homepage                   other issues
 

  • CURRENT ISSUES -- Editor: Mr Justice P W Young AO
  • Open courts
        p.83                                                                                        +cite    
  • Open courts: Security concerns
        p.84                                                                                        +cite    
  • Justice in 1804
        p.84                                                                                        +cite    
  • English Chancery judge retires early
        p.84                                                                                        +cite    
  • That bottle of water
        p.85                                                                                        +cite    
  • Judicial titles
        p.85                                                                                        +cite    
  • Expert witnesses
        p.86                                                                                        +cite    
  • Retirement ages of judges
        p.86                                                                                        +cite    

  • CONVEYANCING AND PROPERTY -- Editor: Peter Butt
  • Landlord's liability for defective premises
        p.87                                                                                        +cite    
  • Vendor as trustee
        p.88                                                                                        +cite    
  • Licence not effectively coupled with a grant
        p.88                                                                                        +cite    
  • "Dealing" with an interest in property
        p.89                                                                                        +cite    

  • PEOPLE IN THE LAW -- Editor: Geoff Lindsay SC
  • Bar Council elections (NSW)
        p.91                                                                                        +cite    
  • Appointment of Senior Counsel (Qld)
        p.91                                                                                        +cite    

  • RECENT CASES -- Editor: Mr Justice P W Young AO
  • Schooling witnesses
        p.92                                                                                        +cite    
  • Criminal law: Sexual assault -- What is touching?
        p.92                                                                                        +cite    
  • Expert evidence: Joint reports
        p.92                                                                                        +cite    
  • Names of adopted children
        p.92                                                                                        +cite    
  • Corporations law: Insolvent trading -- Whether extends to trustee companies where trust assets are deficient -- Subrogation -- Purchaser's lien vs mortgagee
        p.93                                                                                        +cite    
  • Admiralty: what property may be seized on arrest of ship
        p.94                                                                                        +cite    
  • Breach of freezing orders: Liability for damages
        p.94                                                                                        +cite    
  • Cost orders against witnesses
        p.94                                                                                        +cite    
  • Precedent
        p.94                                                                                        +cite    
  • Contract: Mistake mistake
        p.95                                                                                        +cite    

  • ARTICLES
  • THE EXECUTIVE AND THE JUDICIARY: A POTENTIAL FOR CONFLICT
        Hon Justice Peter McClellan
        p.97                                                                                        +cite        
        Tension between the Executive and the judiciary is always a possibility. In recent years that possibility has materialised in England where there have been strident and, from a distance, amusing exchanges over the issue of asylum seekers. In this article the author considers the position in England and contrasts it with experience in Australia, particularly in environmental law. The environment provides fertile ground for conflicts between the government of the day and the judiciary. He considers why there has been only minor controversy in New South Wales, generated by comment from the judiciary rather than politicians. The author confirms the legitimate role of the judiciary in the review of administrative decisions but emphasises that it depends upon the review body identifying and articulating the principles by which its decisions are made
  • ACCESSORIAL LIABILITY FOR MISLEADING OR DECEPTIVE CONDUCT
        Michael Pearce, SC
        p.104                                                                                      +cite        
        This article reviews the circumstances in which a person will be liable under the Trade Practices Act 1974 (Cth) as an accessory for the misleading or deceptive conduct of another on behalf of whom the first person has acted, most commonly where company directors act as agents for their companies. The article reviews the limitations on accessorial liability imposed by the requirement of knowledge on the part of the accessory that the principal's conduct was misleading or deceptive. It also reviews other uncertainties about whether the knowledge may be constructive or must be actual, whether the accessory has the burden of proving that the principal had reasonable grounds for making a representation about a future matter and whether conduct by an accessory must occur wholly within Australia. Finally, it examines the corresponding State and Territory legislation to see whether it can avoid any of the limitations about the operation of the federal Act
  • RECONSIDERING THE SCOPE OF THE EQUITABLE MORTGAGE ARISING FROM DEPOSIT OF TITLE DOCUMENTS
        S Hepburn
        p.121                                                                                      +cite        
        This article examines the underlying fairness of applying equitable security presumptions to the deposit of title documents belonging to third parties. It argues that within such transactions, the focus of the equitable jurisdiction must be upon the intention of the owner of the title documents rather than presumptions arising from the fact of the deposit. It suggests that there is no logic in applying equitable presumptions, founded on the principles of part performance, to infer a security intention in transactions involving third party title documents. The fact that the parties to a loan advance may have intended to create a mortgage between themselves does not mean that the third party owner of the title documents also intended to create a mortgage. In third party transactions, the objectives of the equity jurisdiction are best achieved through a comprehensive assessment of the intention of all parties and the abolition of presumptions based upon the bare fact of title deposit
  • LEGAL PROFESSIONAL PRIVILEGE AND THE FOREIGN LAWYER IN AUSTRALIA
        Christopher Kee and Jeremy Feiglin
        p.131                                                                                      +cite        
        Legal professional privilege is very important to lawyers and clients alike. It has evolved within the common law world over a period of centuries. In a domestic Australian context the test to establish what attracts advice privilege has become reasonably well settled. However, the increasingly international character of commerce has revealed new challenges. Is the current test appropriate to determine whether advice given outside Australia by a foreign lawyer is privileged? This article considers that question in detail. After examining the historical development of legal professional privilege, the article discusses Kennedy v Wallace (2004) 208 ALR 424 (at first instance) and Kennedy v Wallace (2004) 142 FCR 185 (on appeal). The article concludes that the current test is both capable and appropriate if properly applied