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  Australian Law Journal   (Australia)
  Volume 83, Number 3, March 2009
  homepage                   other issues
 

  • CURRENT ISSUES — Editor: Mr Justice P W Young AO
  • Turn of the years
        p.139                                                                                      +cite    
  • Law schools and the profession
        p.139                                                                                      +cite    
  • Elder law
        p.140                                                                                      +cite    
  • Supreme Court of Western Australia: Annual review
        p.140                                                                                      +cite    
  • Seniors cards
        p.141                                                                                      +cite    
  • "Public interest" bodies
        p.141                                                                                      +cite    
  • Writing of judgments
        p.141                                                                                      +cite    
  • Legal aid
        p.142                                                                                      +cite    
  • Performance indicators
        p.142                                                                                      +cite    
  • Visiting America
        p.143                                                                                      +cite    
  • Qatar Law Forum
        p.143                                                                                      +cite    
  • Valé Horace Rumpole
        p.144                                                                                      +cite    
  • LETTER TO THE EDITOR
        p.147                                                                                      +cite    

  • CONVEYANCING AND PROPERTY — Editor: Peter Butt
  • Sale by registered mortgagee
        p.148                                                                                      +cite    
  • Sale by second (unregistered) mortgagee
        p.149                                                                                      +cite    
  • When is an "exception" a "reservation"?
        p.150                                                                                      +cite    
  • The dangers in time provisions (1): Don't be early
        p.151                                                                                      +cite    
  • The dangers in time provisions (2): Don't be late
        p.151                                                                                      +cite    
  • The conveyancing game
        p.152                                                                                      +cite    

  • RECENT CASES — Editor: Mr Justice P W Young AO
  • When does a strata building manager commit misconduct?
        p.154                                                                                      +cite    
  • Unincorporated association: Whether charitable — When dissolved
        p.154                                                                                      +cite    
  • Conditional contract for the sale of land
        p.155                                                                                      +cite    
  • Contempt: False information given to court—Case then settled
        p.155                                                                                      +cite    
  • De facto directors
        p.155                                                                                      +cite    
  • Pornography: Admissibility of expert evidence
        p.156                                                                                      +cite    
  • Best endeavours
        p.156                                                                                      +cite    
  • Mutual wills
        p.157                                                                                      +cite    
  • Case management
        p.157                                                                                      +cite    
  • Costs
        p.158                                                                                      +cite    

  • ARTICLES
  • EXERCISE BY SUPERANNUATION TRUSTEES OF DISCRETIONARY POWERS
        J C Campbell
        p.159                                                                                      +cite        
        This article examines: (a) the circumstances in which a court will hold that a trustee's discretionary decision, or decision that in its opinion there exists some fact on which entitlements to benefits depends, is made in breach of trust; (b) the effect the court should give, in deciding whether there has been such a breach of trust, to the great practical importance to a superannuation fund member of benefits being paid, and to the fact that a fund member has in effect purchased his or her rights in the fund; (c) whether natural justice or any other obligation to receive submissions before making a decision has any role to play in deciding the validity of such decisions; (d) the principles by reference to which a court formulates a remedy if there has been a breach of trust in such a decision; and (e) the very important statutory procedures by which decisions concerning superannuation funds can be reviewed in the Superannuation Complaints Tribunal.
  • QUASI-TRUSTS
        Justice Peter W Young, AO
        p.181                                                                                      +cite        
        Modern equity courts often need to consider situations that resemble trusts, but which do not fit within the traditional definition of trusts. Many of these involve people who are incapable of managing their own affairs. This article considers a number of such situations and how the courts deal with them. Particular problems arise with elderly people being convinced by their children or acquaintances to give up or mortgage their homes for the benefit of others. These cases can sometimes be dealt with as equitable fraud or by way of constructive trust. The traditional remedies of equity can be applied to see that justice is done in such cases. In other situations, statutes have set up regimes similar to trust, but which are given their own statutory remedies.
  • IN-HOUSE COUNSEL, LEGAL PROFESSIONAL PRIVILEGE AND "INDEPENDENCE"
        Justice Brian Tamberlin and Lucas Bastin
        p.193                                                                                      +cite        
        A previous contribution to this journal discussed the notion of "independence" as a barrier to claims of legal professional privilege by in-house counsel. These comments prompt us to observe that, while jurisprudence of the European courts supports a presumption that in-house counsel lack sufficient independence to claim legal professional privilege in respect of communications with their employer clients, any distinction between them and external legal advisers on the basis of a presumption that they lack professional independence is misconceived.
  • ANDREW INGLIS CLARK: THE MAN AND HIS LEGACY
        Hon Peter Heerey, QC
        p.199                                                                                      +cite        
        Andrew Inglis Clark (1848-1907), Tasmanian lawyer, politician and judge, has been somewhat belatedly recognised as the primary architect of the Australian Constitution. He was strongly influenced by the American constitutional experience and his profound understanding of American constitutional law was unmatched by any other Australian. Politically Clark was liberal and democratic. During two terms as Attorney-General for Tasmania, Clark introduced much reforming legislation. He was a life-long opponent of "every institution that confers political power or personal privilege as an appendage to birth from a particular parentage". His name lives on in the Hare-Clark electoral system. Clark played an active role in the literary and intellectual life of Tasmania and was a founder of the University of Tasmania.