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  Australian Law Journal   (Australia)
  Volume 83, Number 5, May 2009
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  • CURRENT ISSUES — Acting Editor: Justice G A A Nettle
  • The press and the public perception of justice
        p.283                                                                                      +cite    
  • Abolition of commital hearings: Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose
        p.283                                                                                      +cite    
  • E-discovery: Cheap and cheery or billion dollar industry?
        p.284                                                                                      +cite    
  • Vexatious litigants: Co-operative federalism and human rights
        p.285                                                                                      +cite    
  • How much of what glitters is Marlborough Gold?
        p.285                                                                                      +cite    
  • Revolution to seize control of litigation
        p.286                                                                                      +cite    

  • CONVEYANCING AND PROPERTY — Editor: Peter Butt
  • Strata title: Protecting minority interests in a collective sale
        p.288                                                                                      +cite    

  • PEOPLE IN THE LAW — Editor: Geoff Lindsay SC
  • Justice P A Bergin (NSW)
        p.292                                                                                      +cite    
  • Appointment of Senior Council (Tas)
        p.293                                                                                      +cite    

  • RECENT CASES — Acting Editor: Justice G A A Nettle
  • Contract: "Reimbursement conversation" not a binding contract
        p.294                                                                                      +cite    
  • Corporations: Judicial review of chair's decision to exclude votes
        p.294                                                                                      +cite    
  • Deed: Voluntary transfer set aside for mistake of fact
        p.295                                                                                      +cite    
  • Insurance: Amounts owed to bank held covered by trade credit insurance policy
        p.295                                                                                      +cite    
  • Landlord and tenant: Damages for breach of covenant
        p.296                                                                                      +cite    
  • Practice and procedure: Opt out class action procedure no longer to be preferred
        p.296                                                                                      +cite    
  • Private international law: Restraint of fraudulent alienation of foreign immmovables an exception to mocambique rule
        p.297                                                                                      +cite    
  • Restraint of trade: Covenant not to be employed, carry on or be financially or otherwise engaged in competitive business
        p.297                                                                                      +cite    
  • Traffic law: Policeman driving on duty in a manner dangerous to the public
        p.298                                                                                      +cite    

  • ARTICLES
  • ENFORCEABILITY OF AGREEMENTS TO MEDIATE: SEVENTEEN YEARS AFTER HOOPER BAILIE
        Robert Angyal, SC
        p.299                                                                                      +cite        
        In 1992, in Hooper Bailie Associated Ltd v Natcon Group Pty Ltd (1992) 28 NSWLR 194, the New South Wales Supreme Court enforced an agreement to mediate. It recognised that an agreement to mediate was not an unenforceable agreement to agree, but rather an agreement to participate in a process from which agreement might arise. The second breakthrough was that an agreement to mediate did not necessarily lack certainty. However, Hooper Bailie did not decide whether an agreement to mediate could be specifically performed, nor whether an agreement to mediate in good faith was enforceable. It is submitted, in the light of developments in case law and statute law, that specific performance should be available and that an agreement to mediate in good faith is enforceable.
  • DRAFTING AN EFFECTIVE INTERNATIONAL ARBITRATION CLAUSE
        Malcolm Holmes, QC
        p.305                                                                                      +cite        
        International arbitration is a part of a coherent globalised system for resolving commercial disputes where parties have the ability to effectively and efficiently enforce the resulting arbitration awards virtually throughout the world. Nonetheless, international arbitration is at its core a consensual process which is founded in contract. The increasing Australian involvement in international trade means that it is inevitable that practitioners are likely to become involved in transactions which require an international arbitration clause. The aim of this article is to identify and consider the legal issues which are involved in drafting an effective international arbitration clause in an international transaction.
  • THE FIJIAN COUP CASES: THE CONSTITUTION, RESERVE POWERS AND THE DOCTRINE OF NECESSITY
        Anne Twomey
        p.319                                                                                      +cite        
        If a coup d'état, of necessity, overturns the rule of law, then it is both unusual and potentially self-defeating for a court to rule on its legality. That is why cases on coups are both rare and the object of fascination. How does a court, in those circumstances, accommodate the strict application of the law with recognition of the reality of a new governing regime and the serious risk to public safety that might flow from its judgment? This was the dilemma facing the Fijian Court of Appeal in April 2009.
  • TRANSLATING THE PUBLIC LAW "MAY" INTO THE COMMON LAW "OUGHT': THE CASE FOR A UNIQUE COMMON LAW CAUSE OF ACTION FOR STATUTORY NEGLIGENCE
        Scott Wotherspoon
        p.331                                                                                      +cite        
        The law of negligence as it relates to public authorities that fail to exercise statutory powers to prevent harm is complex and important. This article proposes that every inquiry concerning the duty of care question should pass over a four stage analysis, one of which involves asking whether the failure to exercise the power was ultra vires or Wednesbury irrational in a public law sense. If the four stage analysis is followed, it will be possible to resolve negligence cases by reference to criteria of some specificity and in a manner which maintains coherence with an authority's public law obligations. The roots of the proposed test are orthodox and of longstanding. They can be traced from Lord Diplock's speech in Dorset Yacht Club Co Ltd v Home Office [1970] AC 1004 and Gibbs CJ's reasons in Sutherland Shire Council v Heyman (1985) 157 CLR 424.

  • BOOK REVIEWS
  • Statutory Interpretation & Human Rights by James Spigelman
        p.346                                                                                      +cite    
  • The Book of the Board (Effective governance for non-profit organisations) by D Fishel
        p.347                                                                                      +cite    

  • OBITUARY
  • Frank Costigan QC
        p.348                                                                                      +cite