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Washington & Lee Law School
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  Australian Law Journal   (Australia)
  Volume 81, Number 5, May 2007
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  • CURRENT ISSUES -- Editor: Mr Justice PW Young AO
  • 80th year of the ALJ Conference
        p.287                                                                                      +cite    
  • The importance of statute law
        p.287                                                                                      +cite    
  • Inconstancy in the High Court
        p.287                                                                                      +cite    
  • Do Bills of Rights destroy democracies?
        p.288                                                                                      +cite    
  • Can the Journal do better?
        p.288                                                                                      +cite    
  • Top ten Australian law books
        p.288                                                                                      +cite    
  • Australian legal history school essay competition
        p.289                                                                                      +cite    

  • CONVEYANCING AND PROPERTY -- Editor: Peter Butt
  • Trees and nuisance in NSW
        p.291                                                                                      +cite    
  • Extension of time in notices to complete
        p.294                                                                                      +cite    

  • OVERSEAS LAW -- Editor: Ross Buckley
  • New wind blows across US securities regulatory landscape
        p.297                                                                                      +cite    

  • INTERNATIONAL FOCUS -- Editor: Ryszard Piotrowicz
  • Forced marriage in the jungle: time to stop beating about the bush
        p.302                                                                                      +cite    

  • RECENT CASES -- Editor: Mr Justice PW Young AO
  • Landlord and tenant: tenant's right to appropriate repayments
        p.308                                                                                      +cite    
  • Cash is best
        p.308                                                                                      +cite    
  • Miscarriages of justice in a civil jury trial
        p.308                                                                                      +cite    
  • Family property on bankruptcy of husband
        p.309                                                                                      +cite    
  • Preparation of affidavits
        p.309                                                                                      +cite    
  • Liability of churches for alleged abuse in orphanages
        p.310                                                                                      +cite    
  • Trusts – appointment of new trustees – trustees de son tort
        p.310                                                                                      +cite    
  • Expert evidence in small motor car cases
        p.311                                                                                      +cite    
  • Quantum meruit: illegal contract
        p.311                                                                                      +cite    
  • Criminal law – court attendence notice – adequacy of particulars of offence
        p.312                                                                                      +cite    

  • ARTICLES
  • PROBLEMS AND PREJUDICES FOR THE SEXUALLY ABUSED CHILD
        Professor Kim Oates
        p.313                                                                                      +cite        
        When a child is sexually abused there are usually no witnesses other than the child and the offender. In contrast to a widely held view that young children have difficulty distinguishing fact from fantasy and have unreliable memories, there is good evidence that children over six years are no more suggestible than adults and are as reliable as adults in their ability to recall events in which they were involved. When errors of truth occur in child abuse cases it is much more likely to be the error of the child not revealing what has happened, or only revealing part of what has happened, rather than a fictitious account. Professionals often over-estimate the linguistic abilities of young children, which can lead to confusion on the part of the child and false conclusions on the part of the interviewer. It is important that those who seek to obtain information from young children develop skills which will enable them to assist the child to give an accurate account of what has happened to them without confusing them, or forcing answers which may be incorrect.
  • FROM TEXT TO CONTEXT: CONTEMPORARY CONTRACTUAL INTERPRETATION
        Hon J J Spigelman, AC
        p.322                                                                                      +cite        
        Over the last two to three decades there has been a paradigm shift in the interpretation of all legal texts, including statutes and contracts, from text to context. The purpose and surrounding circumstances of agreements are increasingly being considered under the rubric of 'commercial construction'. This article charts the emergence of this approach in English and Australian jurisprudence and identifies the risk of undermining commercial certainty as a consequence of this development.
  • BREACH OF CONFIDENCE: DIVIDING THE CAUSE OF ACTION ALONG PROPRIETARY LINES
        Jeremy Birch
        p.338                                                                                      +cite        
        Breach of confidence is a cause of action that courts have traditionally grounded in a broad principle of good faith. As a result, the cause of action has aimed to protect relationships of trust and confidence. A competing view has been that courts protect a proprietary interest in the secrecy of information. This article argues that neither approach is entirely correct. Rather, there are two distinct types of information that breach of confidence protects and that, on this basis, the cause of action should be split. One cause of action should focus on protecting proprietary information, with the other focusing on protecting relationships of trust and confidence.
  • CONFLICT OF LAWS: ENFORCING A JUDGMENT ON A JUDGMENT?
        P St J Smart
        p.349                                                                                      +cite        
        This article analyses the question of whether an Australian court may enforce a foreign judgment which is itself founded upon the judgment of another, different foreign court. The enforceability of a so-called "judgment on a judgment" has been canvassed by academic writers and has the support of at least one recent case (albeit not in an Australian court). Yet this commentator suggests that an Australian court should not enforce the judgment of an intermediary foreign court because such judgment will not meet the requirement that it is a decision on the merits of the parties' dispute.
  • BOOK REVIEWS
        p.354                                                                                      +cite