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  Australian Law Journal   (Australia)
  Volume 79, Number 6, June 2005
  homepage                   other issues
 

  • CURRENT ISSUES -- Editor: Mr Justice P W Young AO
  • Relations with judiciaries of the Asia Pacific region
        p.327                                                                                      +cite    
  • Corporate groups and tort
        p.327                                                                                      +cite    
  • Mistakes in probate
        p.328                                                                                      +cite    
  • Litigation funding
        p.328                                                                                      +cite    
  • Are courts too scary?
        p.329                                                                                      +cite    
  • Lawyers talking to the press
        p.329                                                                                      +cite    
  • We did it again!
        p.330                                                                                      +cite    
  • Biography of Justice Victor Windeyer
        p.330                                                                                      +cite    

  • CONVEYANCING AND PROPERTY -- Editor: Peter Butt
  • Does a "break" clause pass on assignment of the lease?
        p.331                                                                                      +cite    
  • Abandonment of easement
        p.331                                                                                      +cite    
  • Hillpalm issues
        p.333                                                                                      +cite    

  • INTERNATIONAL FOCUS -- Editor: Ryszard Piotrowicz
  • Bakhtiyari case: Balance between asylum seekers, and states' rights
        p.334                                                                                      +cite    

  • RECENT CASES -- Editor: Mr Justice P W Young AO
  • Defamation: Extent of parliamentary privilege
        p.339                                                                                      +cite    
  • Interest on costs
        p.339                                                                                      +cite    
  • When is a vehicle driven "for hire or reward"?
        p.339                                                                                      +cite    
  • Fiduciary duties and joint ventures
        p.340                                                                                      +cite    
  • Litigation funders: White knights or bounty hunters?
        p.342                                                                                      +cite    

  • ARTICLES
  • EFFECTS OF TORT LAW REFORM ON MEDICAL LIABILITY
        Loane Skene and Harold Luntz
        p.345                                                                                      +cite        
        In the period 2001-2004, legislation has been passed in all Australian jurisdictions to effect "tort law reform". This article outlines some of these changes, focusing particularly on the amendments to the Wrongs Act 1958 (Vic), though it also draws attention to corresponding changes in other jurisdictions. The new legislation creates new immunities from liability; limits recovery for psychiatric injury; reintroduces in modified form the Bolam test of professional negligence; replaces the "not far-fetched or fanciful" test of foreseeability with one requiring that the risk be "not insignificant"; extends the scope of the traditional defence of voluntary assumption of risk; and provides caps, thresholds and a higher discount rate in relation to damages. The impact that these changes may have on the liability of health professionals is considered.
  • INCOME TAX SYSTEM OF AUSTRALIA: THE CASE FOR A NEW GENERAL ANTI-AVOIDANCE RULE
        Christopher Bevan
        p.364                                                                                      +cite        
        This article analyses the most recent decision of the High Court of Australia on Pt IVA of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1936 (Cth), which contains the general anti-avoidance rule for the Australian income tax system (a decision involving a small financing transaction by a married couple), and one recent decision of the Federal Court of Australia which applies that decision of the High Court (a decision involving a very large financing transaction by a publicly-owned bank), as the vehicles to argue the case for the adoption of a new general anti-avoidance rule. This article also analyses what is argued to be a unique approach to judicial review of administrative decision making, as demonstrated by the jurisprudence on Pt IVA during the last decade, to make good the proposition that Pt IVA can only be made to work effectively by adopting such a unique approach to the review by the courts of the determinations made by the Commissioner of Taxation to cancel tax benefits of taxpayers which trigger the invocation of Pt IVA.