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  Australian Law Journal   (Australia)
  Volume 82, Number 7, July 2008
  homepage                   other issues
 

  • CURRENT ISSUES — Editor: Mr Justice P W Young AO
  • Canberra
        p.431                                                                                      +cite    
  • Art and pornography
        p.431                                                                                      +cite    
  • Public officials and their families
        p.432                                                                                      +cite    
  • Thomson Reuters Australia and High Court supports development of law in Africa and Caribbean
        p.432                                                                                      +cite    
  • Defamation of women
        p.433                                                                                      +cite    
  • From grandfather's notebook
        p.433                                                                                      +cite    
  • Guest editors
        p.434                                                                                      +cite    
  • LETTER TO THE EDITOR
        p.435                                                                                      +cite    

  • CONVEYANCING AND PROPERTY — Editor: Peter Butt
  • "Very high bar" to clear: Implied repeal of Torrens legislation after City of Canada Bay Council v Bonaccorso Pty Ltd
        p.436                                                                                      +cite    

  • INTERNATIONAL FOCUS — Ryszard Piotrowicz
  • Make sure you keep the right company: Human rights obligations of commercial enterprises
        p.440                                                                                      +cite    

  • RECENT CASES — Mr Justice P W Young AO
  • Title to excavated antiquities
        p.445                                                                                      +cite    
  • Pension scheme: Mistake in deed — whether curable
        p.445                                                                                      +cite    
  • Hastings-bass again
        p.446                                                                                      +cite    
  • Wills: Gift of property in fact owned by company controlled by testator
        p.446                                                                                      +cite    
  • Statutory interpretation: Use of extrinsic materials
        p.446                                                                                      +cite    
  • Limitation of action: Mortgagor in possession
        p.447                                                                                      +cite    
  • What is a proceeding to recover legal costs?
        p.447                                                                                      +cite    
  • Injunctions
        p.447                                                                                      +cite    
  • Games of chance
        p.448                                                                                      +cite    
  • Winemaking: Whether grapes bailed to winemaker
        p.448                                                                                      +cite    
  • Transfers of mortgages: Transfer subject to equities
        p.448                                                                                      +cite    
  • Similar facts again
        p.449                                                                                      +cite    

  • ARTICLES
  • CONSISTENCY AND SENTENCING
        Hon J J Spigelman, AC
        p.450                                                                                      +cite        
        Sentencing for crime involves weighing incommensurable and often contradictory objectives. One such tension is between the principle of consistency and the principle of individualised justice. Consistency is important for the maintenance of public confidence in the administration of justice. The identification of sentencing patterns depends on the transmission of the collective experience of judges. Sentencing statistics have a role to play, albeit a limited one. Maintaining nationwide consistency in sentencing for Commonwealth offences poses particular challenges. Judicial exchanges between courts may make a contribution in this regard.
  • REFORMING PARLIAMENTARY PRIVILEGE IN QUEENSLAND
        Daniel Morgan
        p.461                                                                                      +cite        
        Recent legislative amendments, a political crisis and a Crime and Misconduct Commission investigation have revealed apparently inadvertent alterations to structures and mechanisms which historically have protected freedom of speech in Parliament and avoided institutional clashes between the courts and Parliament. The immediate political crisis was avoided, but the underlying legal tensions which might result in a future crisis remain unaddressed, despite proposals for law reform.
  • THE BLINDNESS OF THE EYE-WITNESS
        Ian R Coyle, David Field and Glen Miller
        p.471                                                                                      +cite        
        A criminal trial is an attempt to recreate the past. It involves the presentation of physical evidence and eyewitness evidence. The scientific model has long been accepted in the presentation of physical evidence but not with eyewitness evidence. Although the courts have long recognised the potential for prejudice that can arise at each stage of the process of eyewitness identification, attempts to remedy this problem have been largely limited to giving judicial warnings and instructing jurors to apply their common sense and human experience. Yet, there are many occasions where common sense fails and there are many occasions where the results of eyewitness identification are counter-intuitive. All too often this has led to grave miscarriages of justice as, whatever warnings are given to a jury, the danger of misidentification remains. The time has come for the superior courts to revisit and carefully examine the very tenuous basis upon which expert evidence is rejected in cases where eyewitness identification is involved.

  • OBITUARY
  • Hon G F K Santow AO
        p.499                                                                                      +cite