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  Australian Law Journal   (Australia)
  Volume 80, Number 9, September 2006
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  • CURRENT ISSUES -- Editor: Mr Justice PW Young AO
  • Thank you
        p.551                                                                                      +cite    
  • Death of Rae Else-Mitchell
        p.551                                                                                      +cite    
  • England mid-2006
        p.551                                                                                      +cite    
  • The usual suspects
        p.551                                                                                      +cite    
  • The NatWest three
        p.552                                                                                      +cite    
  • Hamdan v Rumsfeld
        p.553                                                                                      +cite    
  • Should judges be liable to pay the state the costs thrown away by mistrials?
        p.553                                                                                      +cite    
  • Appointment of judges' associates
        p.554                                                                                      +cite    
  • Juries and sentencing
        p.554                                                                                      +cite    
  • Thirty years of the "new" federal administrative law
        p.554                                                                                      +cite    
  • Appointment of Keith J to International Court of Justice
        p.555                                                                                      +cite    
  • LETTER TO THE EDITOR
        p.556                                                                                      +cite    

  • CONVEYANCING AND PROPERTY -- Editor: Peter Butt
  • Injunction to restrain threatened severance of joint tenancy
        p.557                                                                                      +cite    
  • "I'll have to obtain instructions"
        p.557                                                                                      +cite    
  • Compulsory easements
        p.559                                                                                      +cite    
  • Adverse possession
        p.560                                                                                      +cite    

  • EQUITY AND TRUSTS
  • Sieff v Fox and the rule in Re Hastings-Bass
        p.561                                                                                      +cite    

  • RECENT CASES --- Editor: Mr Justice PW Young AO
  • Public interest immunity
        p.567                                                                                      +cite    
  • Statute of frauds in the 21st century
        p.568                                                                                      +cite    
  • Issue estoppel: Decision of Solicitors' Disciplinary Tribunal
        p.568                                                                                      +cite    
  • Affirmation of contract
        p.569                                                                                      +cite    
  • Validity of "no caveat" clause
        p.569                                                                                      +cite    
  • Sending a grossly offensive message
        p.569                                                                                      +cite    
  • Does having a smoke constitute contributory negligence?
        p.570                                                                                      +cite    

  • ARTICLES
  • SERVING GOD AND THE CHURCH: CLERGY, EMPLOYMENT AND DISCRIMINATION
        Garth Blake, SC
        p.571                                                                                      +cite        
        Throughout the common law world, it has been an established principle that clergy are not employed under a contract of service; their calling does not have any contractual foundation. Attempts by clergy in the past to invoke the statutory remedies of unfair dismissal and workers compensation have failed because of the absence of a contract of service. The decision of the House of Lords in Percy v Board of National Mission of the Church of Scotland [2006] 2 AC 28 on a sex discrimination claim brought by a former minister has significant implications for the status of clergy under the common law, as well as the right of clergy to seek relief under discrimination and unfair dismissal legislation.
  • PROVING STATE BORDERS
        Garry Moore
        p.587                                                                                      +cite        
        Notwithstanding the recognition that the Australian States are invested with a very wide extraterritorial legislative competence, and the impact of the Jurisdiction of Courts (Cross-Vesting) Acts, it remains true to say that most State and Territory laws are confined in their reach within the physical borders of the States and Territories concerned. On occasion, the precise location of such borders will be a significant, and perhaps dominant, issue in court proceedings. This article surveys and illustrates the law relevant to the proof of the location of State and Territory borders.
  • WHEN THE JUDICIARY IS DEFAMED: RESTRAINT POLICY UNDER CHALLENGE
        Kim Gould
        p.602                                                                                      +cite        
        There is a "policy" that judicial officers should not sue for defamation, save in exceptional circumstances. But this is coming under challenge on a number of fronts. Concerns about maintaining public confidence in the judiciary if this policy is relaxed or even abandoned are now largely illusory in the face of a robust judiciary as part of a modern democracy. More worrying is the potential chilling effect on criticism of the judiciary; the real issue is whether the defamation defences are up to the task of adequately protecting this form of speech - and it appears that there may be reason for concern. These issues are considered against the background of the robust views about criticism of the judiciary expressed by Justice Sackville, Chair of the Judicial Conference of Australia and a judge of the Federal Court of Australia, in his Lucinda Lecture and other fora in 2005. The inquiry also provides insight into other wider issues including the interrelationship between the judicial restraint policy and scadalising contempt.
  • BOOK REVIEW
        p.623                                                                                      +cite    
  • OBITUARY
        Rae Else-Mitchell, CMG
        p.625                                                                                      +cite