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  Bio-Science Law Review   (United Kingdom)
  Volume 5, Issue 1, 2001/2002
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  • GENE AND COMPOUND CLAIMS: ANOTHER VIEW
        R. Stephen Crespi
        p.3                                                                                          +cite        
        The author responds to a recent article by Alan White on product claims for chemical compounds. He argues that any change in the legal interpretation of per se claims must come from evidence of real need, and that gene claims should not dominate the whole picture.
  • PATENTS IN THE BIOINFORMATICS FIELD: RELEASING THE GENE GENIE
        Alex Wilson
        p.9                                                                                          +cite        
        The practices of the EPO and USPTO are converging in relation to gene sequence patents, applying IN EFFECT THE AME CRITERIA. While the European Commission's proposal for a Software Patenting Directive represents a move away from the more liberal USPTO approach, many complex software screening inventions may nonetheless have the requisite level of technical contribution to entitle them to patent protections under the proposed Directive.
  • THE BIOTECHNOLOGY DIRECTIVE: A WORK OF GEN(E)IUS?
        Ilanah Simon
        p.13                                                                                        +cite        
        In Netherlands v. European Parliament and Council of the European Union, the European Court of Justice considered and rejected the Netherlands' challenge to the legality of the EC Directive on the Legal Protection of Biotechnological Inventions, which sets out the requirements for patenting biotechnological inventions. This article outlines the Directive and critically analyses the ECJ's decision, with particular emphasis on the arguments as to human dignity, the scope of moralty, and ordre public and compliance with other international obligations concerning patent law.