Current Law Journal Content
Washington & Lee Law School
  Current Law Journal Content
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  Bio-Science Law Review   (United Kingdom)
  Volume 6, Issue 1, 2003/2004
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  • EUROPE'S BIOTECH VISION - SO FAR SO GOOD? A REVIEW OF THE FIRST YEAR OF THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION'S STRATEGY ON LIFE SCIENCES AND BIOTECHNOLOGY
        Robert Fitt and Penny Gilbert
        p.3                                                                                          +cite        
        Earlier in 2003 the European Commission reported on the progress that has been made in implementing its strategy for Europe on Life Sciences and Biotechnology. Whilst the aims of the strategy have been generally welcomed, numerous stumbling blocks remain, not least the development and implementation of patent law and of the regulatory framework relating to GMOs. Whilst progress has been made, dearly there is still much to be done.
  • PATENTING OF BIOTECH INVENTIONS IN EUROPE: NEW DEVELOPMENTS
        Martin Grund and Christian Keller
        p.6                                                                                          +cite        
        In the past few years, the European Patent Office has been coping with an increasing volume of patent application filings in the field of biotechnology. This article will summarise some of the recent hallmark issues confronting patent practitioners and inventors alike while attempting to secure patent rights in Europe.
  • THE PRECAUTIONARY PRINCIPLE. MANAGEMENT OF UNCERTAINTY AND THE BALANCE BETWEEN PRECAUTION AND INNOVATION: TOWARDS NEW STRATEGIES FOR A SUSTAINABLE RISK MANAGEMENT
        Laetitia De Jahgher
        p.12                                                                                        +cite        
        The precautionary principle emerges as a new governance model for risk management in matters of uncertainty. It is not a legal principle: it is more of a public policy management and strategic nature. It does not exclude a science-based approach. More than a legal principle, the precautionary principle offers the basic architecture of a dynamic system based on cooperative and transdisciplinary dialogue able to meet the requirements of sustainable risk management. It reconciles risk analysis and democracy.
  • CASE COMMENTARY: HARVARD ONCOMOUSE - THE EPO'S LATEST WORD
        Andrew Sharples and Duncan Curley
        p.26                                                                                        +cite        
        The latest decision by the EPO Board of Appeal in the long running 'oncomouse patent' saga was published earlier this year. Although reiterating the previous position, rather than radically revising the law, the decision does shed light on the contentious issue of how the EPO will assess objections to patentability on grounds of morality and ordre public. The decision therefore has implications for the patentability of a wide range of inventions in the field of biotechnology.