Current Law Journal Content
Washington & Lee Law School
  Current Law Journal Content
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  Bio-Science Law Review   (United Kingdom)
  Volume 6, Issue 3, 2003/2004
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  • EMBRYONIC CELL PATENTING
        Phillip M. Webber
        p.87                                                                                        +cite        
        The primary aim of this article is to provide an overview of the issues that affect the patenting of human embryonic stem cells under the European Patent Convention (EPC). Since ethical issues play a large part in determining the patentability of such stem cells, ethical issues will be dealt with as far as they relate to the granting of EP patents. However, it is not the aim of this article to deal with the legal aspects of whether research on fertilised human eggs or embryos is or should be allowed under the national laws of the European states. Some comments on the patenting issues in some other countries, notably the United States, will also be given.
  • THE RIGHT TREATMENT? A NEW EUROPEAN REGULATORY REGIME FOR PHARMACEUTICALS
        Isabel Britton and Michael Gavey
        p.99                                                                                        +cite        
        After tough negotiations and extensive lobbying, the overhaul of the European regulatory regime for pharmaceuticals has been completed in time for EU enlargement. The bulk of the new regime will come into force in October 2005. It will have a significant impact on companies in the healthcare sector, whether they are in the business of making innovative or generic products. In this article, we explain the basics of marketing authorisation for medicinal products for human use. We discuss the objectives of the reform process, describe briefly the new administrative structure and role of the EMEA and compare the existing and new rules on authorisation procedure allocation and data exclusivity. We also touch on some other important changes.
  • FROM GATT TO G.A.T.T. - 50 YEARS OF EUROPEAN BIO-IP (PART 1)
        Margaret Llewelyn
        p.107                                                                                      +cite        
        These two articles will provide an outline of some of the developments in bio-intellectual property rights ('bio-IPRs') post-Crick and Watson. As space precludes detailing all aspects of bio-IPR provision the (inevitably personal) focus will be on what can be protected rather than on the scope of the right granted or issues of infringement.